Salmon, Avocado, and Cucumber Makizushi (Sushi Roll)

Finally did it. I’ve had this on my list of annual things to do since 2008: learn how to make sushi. Toughest part was finding a bamboo mat! For our sushi roll, we looked at MakeMySushi.com (classic roll recipe) and used our own desired filling (salmon, avocado, and cucumber). Rather than rewrite all the instructions, I’ll provide some of our own hints:

  • Drink sake. It’s really really good. We had ours chilled.
  • Let the sticky rice cool before rubbing it on the nori.
  • Using the bamboo mat, roll it really tight while making sure the filling doesn’t fly out the ends.
  • Wipe (with paper towel) and wet (with hot water) your knife after every cut (or every few cuts).
  • Be creative with the filling. We started with a simple combo but after two rolls, realized we were pros and graduated to a philly spiced roll (added cream cheese and chili powder).
  • Make some extra and take it to work. That was a really good lunch on Monday…

That’s about it. It was pretty damn easy looking back, so give it a go!

All About The Number 100

In celebration of my 100th post coming earlier this week, I figured I would discuss the number 100!!! I know, what a way to celebrate…

Applications

The number of yards in a football field.
The minimum number of yards for a par 3 hole in golf.
The number of years in a century.
The number of cents in a dollar (or pence in a pound sterling)
The boiling temperature of water at sea level, in Celsius.
The atomic number of fermium which is made by blasting plutonium with neutrons (named after the great nuclear physicist Enrico Fermi).
The number of senators in the United States Senate.
The number of tiles in a standard Scrabble set.
The basis for percentages (100% represents wholeness, purity, and perfection).
In China, tradition holds that the naming of a newborn panda must wait until the cub is 100 years old.
Pythagoreans considered 100 as divinely divine because it is the square (10^2) of the divine decad (10).
Nostradamus’ work titled “Centuries” contains 10 chapters of 100 verses each.
There are 100 squares in the 10×10 Euler (Latin or Graeco-Roman) Square. A Latin square consists of sets of the numbers 0 to 9 arranged in such a way that no orthogonal (row or column) contains the same number twice. See the image above for an example of a colorful Gaeco-Roman Square for n=10 (the capability for which was discovered by E.T. Parker of Remington Rand in 1959, disproving earlier Eulerian conjectures that a 10×10 square was impossible).

In Language

“Cem” – Portuguese
“Cent” – French
“Cento” – Italian
“Cien” – Spanish
“Honderd” – Dutch
“Hundert” – German
“Hundra” – Swedish
“Hundre” – Norwegian
“Hundred” – English
“Hundrede” – Danish
“Hyaku” – Japanese
“Miyya” – Arabic
“Sad” – Farsi
“Sada” – Estonian
“Sata” – Finnish
“Sto” – Croatian, Czech, Polish
“Száz” – Hungarian
“Yibai” – Chinese
“Yüz” – Turkish

Note: “Cent” is the largest number in the French language that is in alphabetical order. And funny enough, when you spell out 2*5*10=100 in French, it’s all in alphabetical order too! (deux*cinq*dix=cent)

A Mathematical Investigation

100 = 2^2 * 5^2 (factorization of 100)
100 = (1 + 2 + 3 + 4)^2
100 = 1^3 + 2^3 + 3^3 + 4^3 = 1 + 8 + 27 + 64
100 = The sum of the first nine prime numbers (2+3+5+7+11+13+17+19+23)
100 = The sum of four pairs of prime numbers (47+53, 17+83, 3+97, 41+59)
100 = The sum of the first ten odd numbers (1 + 3 + 5 + 7 + 9 + 11 + 13 + 15 + 17 + 19)
100 = 2^6 + 6^2 making it a Leyland Number.
100 can be expressed as a sum of some of its divisors making it a semi-perfect number.
100 is divisible by the number of primes below it (25) making it a polygonal number.
100 is divisible by the sum of its digits (in both base 10 and base 4) making it a Harshad Number.
100 is the 854th to 856th digits of pi.
100 is the 3036th to 3038th digits of phi.

In numerology, 100 equals “I LOVE WISDOM TRUTH BEAUTY”
(9) + (3 + 6 + 4 + 5) + (2 + 5 + 1 + 3 + 2 + 7) + (5 + 9 + 1 + 4 + 6 + 4)

Sources / Links

a simple estimation of height

Geometry is useful for more than just passing the sixth grade.

In October, I posted on estimation as an essential analytical tool to have today (and more importantly, tomorrow). It’s useful for scheduling, planning, purchasing, and other decision-making circumstances. Well here’s a quick and easy geometric technique for estimating the height of very large things. All you need is an intermediate height of reference (perhaps a friend) and your eyes.

For this example, I will use a friend as my intermediate point of reference and a large building as the object for which I wish to estimate the height.

Line up your friend between you and the building. Your friend should be positioned so that when your eyes (A) are as close as possible to the ground, the top of your friend’s head (C) lines up with the top of the building (E). You’re essentially creating the hypotenuse of a large triangle!

Now, let’s label and identify the other parts of our picture.

Here are our labels.

Given this picture, geometry tells us that certain relationships exist.

Therefore, three easy estimations must be made in order to get the estimated height of the building (y):

       w = the distance between you and your friend
       x = the distance between you and the building
       z =  the height of your friend 

NOTE: Be sure to use the same units in your estimations (feet or yards, perhaps) or else your calculation will not work. 

Once you have those three values, just leave the rest to geometry. You have basically created one right triangle inside another right triangle, assuming the building and your friend are both standing up straight. Therefore they have equal angles and therefore equal ratios of their legs, allowing us to make this simple calculation. The result:

Math is fun, right? 🙂

a couple of great commercials

Two great commercials for two different reasons.

In a time when 99.99% of all commercials are excessively loud, irrelevant, and annoying, it’s nice to find two that are creatively fun (and productive). Some businesses should take a lesson.

American Express: Simple, creative, and soft.

State Farm: Quick, funny, and catchy.

perfects, primes, and planets

a simple poem with a significant end
get the result, and perhaps you’re a friend
so riddle me this, riddle me that,
use pen and paper and your best thinking cap…

let’s start you off, here’s one for the money
in chinese it’s death, unlucky but funny

the seventh fibonacci should be easy to see
but if that’s too hard then take two to the three

now keep the dwarf in the orbital loop,
give me a count of our planetary group

a champion of numbers, a winner of sort,
when one has won and they’re top of their sport

then something to fathom, the star is divine
or give me a width of a vitruvian kind

now how bout a gimme, a favorite of mine
this one’s the one only even prime

and last but not least, i hope you’re awake
the first perfect is this keplerian snowflake

now put them together, from bottom to top
a day in my life – big thanks, mom and pop!

make your own ringtone

Make a ringtone from any mp3 file in iTunes in under a minute.

Personal Note: I say keep it on vibrate most of the time out of politeness for the general public, but use the ringtones for your morning alarm!

1. In iTunes, find the song from which you want to make a ringtone. Write down the interval of time you wish to capture (e.g. the chorus from 1:13 to 1:27).

2. Right-click on the mp3 file and select ‘Get Info’.

3. Go to the tab for ‘Options’, check the boxes for ‘Start Time’ and ‘End Time’, and input the interval you wish to capture in your ringtone. Hit ‘OK’.

4. With that mp3 file still highlighted, go up top to the ‘Advanced’ menu and select ‘Create AAC Version’. This will automatically create a new file in your library (and it should have a length equal to the interval you set previously).

5. Drag and drop this new AAC file to your desktop. It should have a .m4a extension.

6. Change the extension of this file from “.m4a” to “.m4r”.

7. Drag this file from your desktop back into iTunes. It should now be available in your ‘Ringtones’ library on the left. If you don’t see this library, got to Preferences and make sure you have checked the box to show this library in your iTunes.

8. Lastly, you can delete the file on your desktop, and can delete the AAC version of the song in your iTunes music library. Also, remember to change the original mp3 file back to the normal start and end times (just unclick the boxes).

9. Sync your iPhone/ringtones and you’re good to go.

Reference: eHow

official st. calzone’s day 2010 announcement

And here we are, only five months away from another spectacular spring celebration of friends, food, and fun! I would now like to officially announce the date for the Seventh Annual St. Calzone’s Day celebration:

Saturday, March 20th, 2010
The venue is TBD, although, due to the great success of last year, there is currently a high probability that it will take place in Arlington, Virginia once again. The menu is by no means set, but I can promise there will be food and it will be good. I don’t think we’ll make another 15 pans of food, but will probably get some catered dishes supplemented by some homemade St. Calzone’s Day favorites: Spider Potatoes, Sausage, Peppers, and Onions, Beef Cutlets, Stuffed Shells,…
Anyways, mark your calendars for 3/20/2010 and I hope to see everyone for another great celebration!
With Sauce and Cheese,