Visualizing the U.S. Men’s National Soccer Team Roster

As the World Cup approaches, countries begin to solidify their rosters, trying to optimize their squad to give the best chance of taking home the FIFA trophy. As the Bob Bradley recently announced the United States’ 30-man roster, we wonder where these players come from and how can their stats be visualized?

Obviously, it would be most valuable to visualize comprehensive stat sheets of the U.S. team players against all other teams and their players, especially the others in Group C (England, Algeria, Slovenia). Unfortunately, I don’t have that much time! So, elementary as these may be, here are some quick visualizations, given the data provided on the US Men’s National Team (USMNT) website.

1. Full 30-Man Roster, with Hometowns, Club Teams, and Total USMNT Goals (by Position)

2. Player Experience (Age vs Total Caps, by Position)

3. Player Size (Height vs Weight, by Position)

Some things to note, although I have not determined an international baseline from which these conclusions can be definitively made, is that our goalkeepers are old and our midfielders are relatively small, young and inexperienced. But I bet you didn’t need me to tell you that!

Regardless, the World Cup is surely a global spectacle and I’m very much looking forward to it. Hopefully the US squad can take Group C and show some true grit and determination on the international stage. Four weeks to go…

A Visualization Of Deadliest Earthquakes Since 1900

Earlier today, The Guardian DataBlog resourcefully provided a link to USGS earthquake data. The table lists all individual earthquakes that have caused 1,000 or more deaths, since 1900. Data elements include date, location, latitude, longitude, deaths, and magnitude. Below are some summary tables and a map that visualize this data. You can also click here for some USGS maps of the Haiti earthquake.

Map of Deadliest Earthquakes, 1900-2009
Dot Size = Total Deaths,
Dot Color = Average Magnitude

Summary of Deadliest Earthquakes by Year, 1900-2009

Summary of Deadliest Earthquakes by Month, 1900-2009

Investigation of Relationship Between Earthquake Magnitude and Deaths, 1900-2009

As a note for the right-side plot, I’ve cut out the earthquakes causing more than 20,000 deaths to just look at those causing between 1,000 and 20,000 deaths. Looking at the entire data set, the correlation coefficient for earthquake magnitude and total deaths is about 0.286 which represents a weak positive relationship between the two variables. Obviously, the existence of a relationship does not imply that a higher magnitude earthquake causes more total deaths, but it is insightful to identify a relationship between the two variables to inspire more investigation. Moving forward, one might investigate the data for clusters based on geo-location, decade, or season (controlled for hemisphere).

My thoughts and prayers go out to those affected by the Haiti earthquake.

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